Wednesday, November 23, 2011

A Plethora of Pollock

I know they aren't exactly uncommon or high-end but I absolutely love Knoll Pollocks.  They're durable, comfortable, and have an attractive minimalist design.

However, as they say, you can have too much of a good thing.


(Yes, that is a Snuggie resting atop that Knoll Pollock.)

I think that might be the case here, as I've assembled quite an extensive collection.  I've got cloth, vinyl, leather, 4 star bases, 5 star bases, tagged, untagged, black-rimmed, chrome-rimmed, you name it.  And yet, not a single one has upholstery that is in good condition.



It would seem that my home has become a shelter for abused and abandoned Knoll Pollocks.  It's like a mid-century modern orphanage.

But just look at these pitiful chairs.  They've been scratched, scuffed, stained, and had buttons ripped from their cushions.  Could you turn these poor wretches away at your door?




I certainly couldn't, but that's left me with a bit of a predicament: no money, no time, and no idea how to fix them up.




<cue uplifting piano music>

Every day, thousands of mid-century office chairs suffer neglect and abuse.  Hi, I'm Nick from Save the Pollocks.  For only a dollar a day, you could make a difference in the life of this poor Knoll Pollock.  Give the gift of a brighter future with fresh upholstery and properly attached buttons.  Donate today and you will receive a hand-written letter written from the comfort of your adopted chair.  Thank you for your support and kindness and have a wonderful day.

(Disclaimer: Save the Pollocks is not an actual charity.  All proceeds from Save the Pollocks will, in all likelihood, be used to purchase additional unneeded mid-century crap.)






15 comments:

  1. Some of those fabric pictures really tugged at my heart strings. If you had included a photo of yourself with a sad face playing on a mound of filthy batting, my check would have been in the mail.

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  2. You didn't show any shots of the backs. If these can be fairly easily disassembled they might not be too hard to recover. I'll have to see if I can find one around here after I finish the Plycraft I'm currently working on.

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  3. When you asked me if I would complete some "projects" over christmas is this what you had in mind? I was thinking more along the lines of... baked goods and not reupholstering 3 zillion Pollocks you found on death row.

    One day, when when you return home to find 20 stray dogs that pulled at my heart strings I will remind you of these purchases...

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  4. cool post..i do keep seeing pollocks but they are priced beyond my comfort zone :(

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  5. Have a look at a few used office furniture liquidation stores. That's where most of mine have come from and they've been very cheap (obviously for a reason).

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  6. Reupholstered Steelcase chair project

    http://howaboutorange.blogspot.com/2011/09/reupholstered-steelcase-chair-project.html

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  7. Thanks Oubli. I actually just picked up one of those Steelcase chairs right before I bought the Pollock.

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  8. Did you ever figure out how to reupholster these bad boys? I am having a hard time figuring out how to take mine apart without destroying something.

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    1. Not yet. Just haven't had the time. If I do get to it, I'll certainly make a post.

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  9. Is it possible to take these apart I just got 10 I need to re cover any one has the solution plss thank you

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    1. I assume so. I mean they had to go together somehow. One day I'll have the time to actually give it a try, but I've been too busy as of late. If I come across anything, I'll be sure to post it.

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  10. I too am waiting to hear if and how you managed to get one of these beauties taken apart. It's been a year now since this post; any progress?
    stephen@rair.org

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    1. No progress on the Pollocks yet. It's been a pretty crazy year and most of my projects have been on hold until things settle down. Hopefully I'll get to work on them soon.

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  11. Has anyone figured out yet how to take the pieces apart? I started this project and I don't know if I can finish it....

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  12. I began my career at Knolls over 35 years ago. I upholstered many of these chairs years ago. the leather or fabric depending on the type you have will be sewed to a heavy black extrusion that is forced into a grove that runs all the way around the inner rim of the chair. To remove the cover you must start at the very lower front of the cushion . There you will find a seam in the extrusion. In order to have any luck in separating the upholstery from the rim without ruining the extrusion you must absolutely use a type of silicone liquid or spray to wet the area of the extrusion that was forced into the rim when originally assembled. After doing this carefully force a needle nose pliers into and thru the extrusion at the seam of the extrusion. Clamp the pliers onto the extrusion. Very carefully use upwards pressure this will take a considerable amount of force. The extrusion was difficult to remove when new and at times it would rip. Remember the extrusion is now very old and may be brittle. I believe you have a good chance of succeeding if you are very patient. Silicone must be used to assist and lubricate the entry point of the extrusion into the rim. Good luck.

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